Posted in Uncategorized

If I only had a heart…

I could stay young and chipper

And I’d lock it with a zipper

If I only had a heart

If I Only Had A Heart sung by Jack Haley
From the Wizard of Oz

I know some of you may have noticed that I have slowed down posting here and on Facebook.

I thought I’d let you know my situation.

In Need of a Heart

On May 5th of this year, my husband, my daughters’ dad, had a sudden cardiac arrest at work. He works at the Oakland Airport for Southwest Airlines. 

When this happened, he was walking down a hallway going to the break room when he fell to the ground. His co-worker saw him out of the corner of his eye and called 911.

But here’s the good part he just happened to fall outside of a classroom where a CPR class was in session.  He became the class!  CPR was initiated immediately, and the paramedics were within minutes.

They brought him back to us. Yeah CPR!

He was rushed to Highland Hospital where he was put into a medically induced coma. He came out of it two days later with no memory of the previous days.

at Highland

He was discharged from Highland Hospital on May 13th after having a defibrillator inserted and an ok’d to go back to work on June 1st.   

He went back to work on June 4th and did fine, just a little slower than usual. He went back to work on June 7th; he left early because he wasn’t feeling well. I took him to the VA clinic in downtown Oakland, and they determined he needed to be rushed back to the ER at Highland Hospital. He went via an ambulance, and I went via our car.

Long story short, the doctors at Highland (shout out to them) determined that he needed to be transferred to California Pacific Medical Center(CPMC) in San Francisco for them to evaluate him for either a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or a heart transplant.  

He was transferred to CPMC on June 11th.

On June 18th, they determined he was a good candidate for a transplant and added him to the UNOS list.

Hayley and her Dad

Today, July 4th, he is still in the hospital, attached to many machines waiting for a heart.

A real heart.

My heart is breaking having him so far away from us.  

He has been very supportive of me writing this blog and all the research I do for the various groups on Facebook. But the little I do make is not be enough to cover our living expenses, the cost of going back and forth to SF, and the mounting medical bill (our share.)

My daughter set up this is June.

https://gofund.me/03159441

Thank you, everyone, for all the excellent comments you have left or have told me in person about how much you love my blog.  

Thank you, Dorothy

More info:

The End

Posted in Buildings, Oakland, Real Estate, Then and Now

Unique Apartments Courts – Bungalow Courts

It has been awhile since I have published a new post. I have been dealing with an major medical issue in my family. It is still ongoing. This is something I put together a while back.

bungalow court is a group of small bungalows or workers cottages built around a court or central yard. An apartment court is a group of buildings built around or have a central courtyard.

Bungalow Court, a New Apartment Site

Oakland Tribune Sept 11, 1921
New Euclid Court Apartments Cheney Photo Advertising Company circa 1921

In 1921 a new kind of building known as a Bungalow Court opened, the first in Oakland. The building is located at Hill Lane and Euclid Avenue.

New Euclid Court Apartments Cheney Photo Advertising Company circa 1921

Euclid Court consists of ten three-room bungalow apartments, grouped around a central courtyard. Each unit has separate front and back entrances.

New Euclid Court Apartments Cheney Photo Advertising Company circa 1921

Euclid Court was built for Dr. J.L. Hobbs at the cost of $75,000 and was designed by W.E. Schirmer.

Today Google Maps
  • 432-450 Euclid Avenue
  • Built 1921
  • 10-units
  • W.E. Schirmer – Architect

Virginia Court Apartments – Filbert Street

Virginia Court is a colorful Spanish type apartment building, with twelve apartments of two rooms each.

Each unit came with the following:

  • Genuine Frigidaire
  • Spark gas ranges
  • steam heat
  • Marshall and Stearns wall-bed
  • 1430 Filbert Avenue
  • Built 1930
  • 12-units

Court Pueblo Apartments – On Foothill Blvd.

The Court Pueblo Apartments opened in February 1930 and is located at 6114 and 6120 Foothill Blvd.

There are twelve units of two or three rooms. Each apartment had the following:

  • Genuine Frigidaire
  • Spark Gas Range
  • Marshall & Stearns Beds

Completely furnished for $45 to $52.50 in 1930

Court Pueblo is Spanish in Style.

  • 6114-6120 Foothill Blvd
  • Built 1930
  • Spanish Style
  • 12-units

Apartment Court on Seminary

“The five-room apartments are practically complete homes.”

Oakland Tribune 1928

Apartment Court opened in January 1928 and is located at 1725 and 1729 Seminary Avenue.

Oakland Tribune Nov 27, 1927

It is four buildings of eight apartments, each attractively arranged in a park-like* setting with a central thoroughfare.

1725 Seminary – Google Maps

No longer a park-like setting

1725 Seminary – Google Maps
  • Four five-room Apartments.
  • Twenty-Two two-room Apartments
  • Kelvinator Refrigerator
  • Spark Ranges
  • Murphy Beds

Brookdale Court

Brookdale Court is located at 3760 Brookdale Ave near 38th Ave.

#7

Bungalow Court

Located at 3745 Brookdale Avenue near 38th Avenue. There are 2 and 3 room units available. They rented for $40 and $45 a month in 1928.

“Seville” Spanish-Type Apartments

Reminiscent of the early history of California the Seville was built by Barr and Sons.

886 Cleveland – Google Maps

“The exterior of lime white stucco in monk finish with wrought iron balconies and, rails, the Spanish court effect with landscaped slopes, broken stepping stones and green shrubbery, the tiles roof of handmade Spanish tiles laid as the early day padres would lay them”

20 apartments of 2,3, and 4 rooms furnished from $57.50 up in 1927.

356 Lester Avenue

More Info:

The End

Posted in Black History, North Oakland, People, West Oakland

Joshua Rose

Oakland’s first black city councilman Joshua Rose. From 1965 to 1977, Rose served on the Oakland City Council representing District 2.

Early Life

Joshua Rose was born in Lexington, Virginia, on September 11, 1906, to Mary Charles, who later married George Rose.

Joshua Rose pictured in 1928 (University of Pittsburgh)

His family relocated to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where Joshua attended Schenley High School.

After high school, he enrolled at the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt), where he completed the required credits for a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree in 1934. He did post-graduate work in economics, philosophy, and psychology at New York University.

YMCA

During his time at Pitt, he worked at the Hill District Center Avenue YMCA. The Y served as a residence for Black students at Pitt who were not allowed to reside at the university residence halls.

The Montclair Times Jun 18, 1935

After graduation, Rose accepted a position with the YMCA in Montclair, New Jersey.

The Pittsburgh CourierFeb 23, 1935
Montclair Times – Feb 1939

In 1939, Rose moved to California with his wife Virginia and their two children, Richard and Virginia, to help establish a branch of the Oakland YMCA for the local African American community.

Oakland Tribune April 23, 1939

He helped create what was later to be known as the Northwest Branch, which was initially located at 36th and San Pablo, but later moved to 3265 Market St. in the early 1940s.

Rose was responsible for introducing summer day camps that incorporated arts and crafts with sports and outdoor activities, including an annual trip to Yosemite National Park.

Oakland Tribune Mar 28, 1943

Rose worked throughout his career to provide many Oakland youth with constructive activities and summertime employment through the YMCA’s programs.  In 1967 Rose retired as Associate General Secretary of the Metropolitan Branch of the YMCA.

Board of Playground Directors

SF Examiner Jul 18, 1947

In 1947, Rose was selected to be the first African American member of the Board of Playground Directors, a group that would eventually become the Oakland Recreation Commission.

Oakland Tribune June 1, 1959

Rose was a board member for 17 years, which included his serving as chairman from 1961 to 1962.

Oakland Tribune May 9, 1957

Oakland City Councilman

On August 27, 1964, he was asked by Mayor John Houlihan if he would complete the unexpired term of Robert V. McKeen on the Oakland City Council. Rose agreed and became the first African American to sit on the Council.

Oakland Tribune Aug 30, 1964

He represented the 2nd District. Rose, a Republican, was re-elected three times in 1965, 1969, and 1973.

“I have a deep interest in Oakland’s future. To secure that future, dedication and sacrifice based on sound academic training and reliable experience are necessary.”

Joshua A. Rose April 1965

He was a respected member of the Council, particularly for his work in easing racial tensions in the city in the late 1960s when the Black Panther Party, founded in Oakland in 1966, challenged the local political establishment.

After sustaining severe injuries in an automobile accident, Rose officially retired from the Council on June 30, 1977.

Death

“Josh was a symbol for us” “A symbol of success.”

Mayor Lionel Wilson Sept 1987

Joshua Rose passed on April 13, 1987, from Parkinson’s disease. He was 81.

SF Examiner April 16, 198

More Info:

The End

Posted in Homes, Montclair Tracts

Maison Normandie – Piedmont Pines

Unique Home Opens

Oakland Tribune June 09 1940

Open to the public (again) in June of 1940 “Maison Normandie” represented France’s famous Normandy style of architecture, both exterior and interior. The house is located a large corner lot high up in the hills of Oakland.

The large living room with a large window affording a view of the Golden Gate, the bridges and Treasure Island. Double french doors open onto a large tiled terrace in the rear with a built in barbecue.

Oakland Tribune 1940

It cost more than $20,000 to build and was advertised at $16,500.

With three bedrooms with two tiled baths, and a maids room with a bathroom. The large basement with laundry room and large storage closets. Two doors gave access to both the front and rear of the house, a short passageway leads into the two-car garage with a large area suitable as a workshop.

  • Maison Normandie
  • Le Mon Park – Piedmont Pines
  • 1938
  • Mitchell & Austin
  • Still there
  • 6235 Castle Drive

Today

6235 Castle Drive – Google Maps

For Sale

1952

Oakland Tribune Apr 06, 1952

$7000 in wall to wall carpet.

Oakland Tribune Apri 11, 1954

Priced at $1,595,000

SF Examiner July 30, 2000

More Info:

The End

Posted in Model/Display Homes, Montclair Tracts

In Le Mon Park

a thing of beauty and joy forever.”


Robert B. Mitchell of Mitchell and Austin
Oakland Tribune Sep 5, 1937

Coronation House Opens

The “Coronation House,” a display home for the Mitchell & Austin, opened on May 2, 1937, in the Le Mon Park section of Piedmont Pines.  It is located on Castle Drive.  The display home was furnished by Breuner’s with the Coronation theme (King George’s Coronation May 1937.)

“English architectural riches have been transplanted to Piedmont Pines in Coronation House”  the ad goes on the say ” Coronation House “fit for a king” in the beautiful Le Mon tract… the crowning achievement of the season”  

Oakland Tribune May 2, 1937
Oakland_Tribune_Sun__May_2__1937_ (6)
Oakland Tribune May 1937

“this six-room home with three bedrooms and a bath, with gorgeous living room and un-impaired view, delightful recreation room and kitchen.”

Oakland Tribune May 1937

“the coronation motif is carried out throughout, the crown drapes furnishing a fitting background for pieces following the English provincial motif ”

Oakland Tribune May 1937

Today

6301 Castle Drive – Google Maps
  • Coronation House
  • Early Colonial
  • 6301 Castle Drive
  • Le Mon Park – Piedmont Pines
  • 1937
  • Mitchell & Austin Real Estate
  • Still there

Fremont House

When General John C. Fremont hiked to a vantage point in the vicinity of Piedmont Pines in time to the setting sun.

“That we shall call the Golden Gate.”

General Fremont – Oakland Tribune Aug 8, 1938
Oakland Tribune May 9, 1937

From the windows of Fremont House you can see the Golden Gate.

  • Fremont House
  • Castle Drive
  • Style – Early California
  • Le Mon Park – Piedmont Pines
  • 1937
  • Mitchell & Austin

Villidor – House of Gold

Commanding a sweeping panorama of the bay and the hills, it offers magnificent views of sunrises and sunsets.”

Oakland Tribune Jun 20, 1937
Oakland Tribune July 27, 1937

Villador, the house of gold opened to the public in June of 1937.

Oakland Tribune July 1937
  • Villador
  • 6324 Castle Drive
  • Le Mon Park – Piedmont Pines
  • 1937
  • Mitchell & Austin
6324 Castle Drive – RDFin.com

More Info:

The End

Posted in Black History, Business, Homes, People, West Oakland

Fanny Wall Children’s Home

Fannie Wall Children’s Home and Day Nursery, an orphanage and daycare center, established in 1918 by African-American clubwomen in West Oakland. Sometimes it is called the Fanny Wall Home.

Charity is the Golden Chain that reaches from heaven to earth.”

from the letterhead

The Beginning

Care for the Orphans

Shelters the Half Orphans

Keeps the Children of Day Workers.”

Oakland Tribune April 1920

In 1914 the Northern Federation of California Colored Women’s Clubs President Fanny Wall and Financial Secretary Hettie Tilghman began working on a children’s home and day nursery to support black working mothers and care for orphaned black children. After years of planning and fundraising, the home opened in 1918 on Peralta Street in West Oakland.

Initially, the home was called the“Northern Federation Home and Day Nursery.” It was subsequently renamed to honor Fannie Wall who was the first woman to run the charity on a daily basis.

The Fannie Wall Children’s Home and Day Nursery was open to children of all races, ethnicities, and religions, it was the first facility in Northern California to provide various services including housing, boarding and daycare for black orphans.

It was located at 1215 Peralta Street in West Oakland from 1918-1928.

Fannie Wall Children’s Home and Day Nursery 1215 Peralta Street – the first site – Courtesy The African American Museum and Library Oakland
Oakland Tribune April 27, 1920

Who was Fannie Wall?

Fannie Wall ( 1860-1944) came to Oakland with her family in the early 1900s.  She was born in Gallatin Tennessee in 1860.  She was married to Archey(Archy) H. Wall (18??-1931), a staff sergeant in the US Army.  They had two daughters, Lillian (Williams) and Florence (Murray) and one son Clifton. Archey was transferred to the Presidio in San Francisco and they ultimately ended up in Oakland.

Wall was an early community activist who participated several organizations that promoted African American economic empowerment.  

Fanny Wall undated- Source: Beasley The Negro Trail Blazers

She served several terms as the president of the California Federation of Colored Women’s Club’s.

She co-founded the Art and Industrial Club of Oakland in 1906.  Under her presidency the club joined the Child Welfare League. Wall also help establish the “Colored Y” of Oakland.

In 1936 Archie Williams her grandson (Lillian)won a gold medal in the 400-meter run in Berlin.

Oakland Tribune Aug 8, 1936

Fannie Wall died on April 14, 1944 in her home on Telegraph Avenue.  She is buried in the same plot as her husband in the San Francisco National Cemetery.

Oakland Tribune Apr 20, 1944

Linden Street Site

In 1928, having outgrown its original location they moved to a new one on Linden Street.

Fannie Wall Children’s Home, 815 Linden – 2nd site -Courtesy The African American Museum and Library Oakland

The handsome house at 815 Linden Street was purchased $5000. The upper middle-class house was designed by Charle Man in the 1880s.  It was one of five buildings built by Frances Reichling a surveyor, who subdivided his property at the corner of Linden Street and Eighth Street.  The largest of the buildings became the family home and the others were rentals.

Linden Street 1948 -African American Museum & Library at Oakland (Oakland, Calif.)

The home could accommodate up to 20 resident children and 8-15 children for day care services and was operated by a professional staff of over ten employees that included social workers and a volunteer psychiatrist. 

The house was considered step up from the one on Peralta Street and was across the street from the “Colored Y.”

Women and children seated around the piano at the Fannie Wall Children’s Home and Day Nursery- undated -African American Museum & Library at Oakland (Oakland, Calif.)

New Look

The Linden Street site was given a face-lift in 1953. The “new look,” a two room addition to be used as the administrative offices, releasing the old offices and reception room for nursery classes and a future library.  The provided room for 47 children.  

In 1962 the Oakland Redevelopment Agency purchased the property at 815 Linden St. in order to demolish the building for the Acorn Project.

Management

Fannie Wall is Calling”

From the annual report

The Northern Federation of Colored Women Clubs operated the Fannie Wall Home until 1941. The home was then incorporated as an independent organization. At that time it was the only home in California that primarily cared for African-American children.

The home was admitted as an agency of the Community Chest-United crusade in 1923

Fannie Wall was elected as the first president and served more than 20 years as the head of the 21 board of directors. She was succeeded by Mrs. Lydia Smith Ward who in turn was followed by Mrs. Chlora Hayes Sledge in the 1940s.

The home was managed by a Board of Directors, which largely consisted of members of the Northern Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, a community advisory committee, and an executive director who oversaw the home’s day-to-day operations.

The Board of Directors of the Fanny Wall Home – Chlora Hays Sledge, President, center-left.Courtesy The African American Museum and Library Oakland

The home was the first Community Chest Children’s Agency in the East Bay to employ a trained social worker.

Girls with fans at the Fannie Wall Home, in the 1940s.Courtesy The African American Museum and Library Oakland

Fundraising

 The home received funding from a variety of sources including rent from an apartment in Berkeley donated by Josephine Sutton, Community Chest, the Dreiser Trust, and through fundraising events coordinated by the home.

Ticket to chicken dinner for Fannie Wall Home Benefit-1944 -African American Museum & Library at Oakland (Oakland, Calif.)
Fannie Wall Children’s Home and Day Nursery, Inc. charity ball program – 1946 – African American Museum & Library at Oakland (Oakland, Calif.)- Identifier
MS162_B1_F6_0
01
Oakland Tribune 1958

The third charity ball was held on January 19, 1948 at the Oakland Auditorium.

In 1959 a fashion show was held at Slim Jenkins to raise money for the building fund.  Models showed the latest styles.

A Haven For Children

Rodeo artists Schwartz and Grodin entertain children with finger paints at the Fannie Wall Children’s Home and Day Nursery – circa 1947 -African American Museum & Library at Oakland Photograph Collection
Oakland Tribune 1949

In 1949  the Fannie Wall home had 30 children who received day care while parents worked.  Ranging in age from 3 to 14 years.During the summer months the children took swimming lessons at the de Fremery Park pool: the enjoyed story hours at the West Oakland Branch Library, and they had special excursions to other city parks and playgrounds.

Birthday Party 1946

Monthly parties were held to honor the children whose birthday occurred during the month. They would dress up for special dinner or an afternoon party.

Oakland Tribune Aug 8, 1948
Integrated Playground at the Fanny Wall Home, the 1950s. Courtesy The African American Museum and Library Oakland

The Final Location

In 1964 they purchased a house at 647 55th Street for $19,000. They initially struggled to obtain a license from the Social Welfare Department, and the home was not re-opened until 1967 as part of a placement program for the Alameda County Welfare Department.

Fannie Wall Children’s Home 55th Street – 3rd site Courtesy The African American Museum and Library Oakland

The home was forced to close again in 1970 for remodeling and reopened in 1978 as a child daycare facility and Head Start Center. It is now called Fannie Wall Head Start.

Group photograph of attendees at Fannie Wall Children’s Home and Day Nursery mortgage burning ceremony (first row, left-right): Annie Mae Smith, Albertine Radford, Silvia Parker, Mildred McNeal, Marge Gibson (second row, left-right): Bessie Watson, Euna Tucker, N. Adams, Lela Posey (third row, left-right): Eugene P. Lasartemay, Roy Blackburn, Kermit Scott, Harold Adams – 1981 -African American Museum & Library at Oakland Photograph Collection
Fannie Wall Pre-K Program – 647 55th Street Oakland CA

More Info:

The End

Posted in Black History, People, Uncategorized

First African American Miss Oakland

Miss Oakland 1968

In 1968, Tanya Dennis was crowned Miss Oakland, becoming the first African-American to wear the crown. She then became one of the early African-American to compete for the title of Miss California.

Oakland Tribune 1968

Miss Dennis was the first of three (in a row) African-American Miss Oakland’s.

Oakland Tribune June 1968

In June of 1969, Miss Dennis competed with 36 other girls from throughout the state for Miss California.

Miss Dennis won the talent division with an exotic African ballet.

Santa Cruz Sentinel June 1968

Miss Dennis was the third runner-up in the Miss California pageant.

 Miss Oakland 1969

In 1969, Laomia McCoy was crowned Miss Oakland, becoming the second African – American to wear the crown and compete for Miss California’s title.

Miss McCoy sang a selection from “Porgy and Bess” to win the talent category in preliminary judging and Miss Redlands, Susan Anton took the swimsuit honor.

The Californian June 20, 1969

Susan Anton won the title of Miss California and Miss McCoy was one of the runner-ups.

Miss McCoy was 19 at the time of the competition and student at Merritt College.

Oakland Tribune May 1969

Miss Oakland 1970

In 1970 Theresa Smith was crowned Miss Oakland becoming the third African-American to wear the crown and compete for Miss California’s title.

Santa Cruz Sentinel June 4, 1970

Smith competed alongside 35 contestants for the title of Miss California.

SF Examiner June 17, 1970

The Miss Congeniality, an award voted by the contestants was awarded to Miss Oakland, Theresa Smith, she was also honored for being the most talented non-finalist dancer in the competition.

Oakland Tribune Nov 12, 1970

Miss Smith was 20 years old at the time of the competition and a student at the University of California.

The officials at the Miss California State pageant refused to allow Miss Smith to perform unless she dropped the “offensive” word, “Black,” from her recitation. It hadn’t been offensive in Oakland.

Oakland Tribune Oct 8, 1970

Black Beauty Queens Denied Rewards

Laomia McCoy and Theresa Smith, Miss Oakland of 1969 and 1970, held a press conference to discuss that they were treated unfairly and racially discriminated against by the Miss Oakland beauty pageant’s sponsors.

“if they had it to do all over again they wouldn’t have competed in the annual pageant.”

Theresa Smith and Laoma McCoy Sept 19, 1970

Negligent

The Oakland Junior Chamber of Commerce (Jaycees) was the pageant’s sponsor for the previous 24 years before 1970.

“I feel that they (the Jaycees) have been negligent in communicating with me and supporting me and have failed to bestow upon me the full benefits of my title said, Miss Smith.

Miss Smith charged that she was promised a $1000.00 scholarship but only received $100, was invited to appear at hardly any civic events, and was denied pay for personal appearances.

SF Examiner 1970

The Jaycees president said her complaints were just a misunderstanding about what the title involves and that she received the same as previous winners.

Theresa ended up getting only a $100 scholarship which was promised before the start of school. The money arrived after final registration at UC, forcing her “to be faced with an additional fee for be late” in registering.

The Jaycees decided to drop their sponsorship of the pageant after 24 years in 1970, they said they were over budget by $1500.

More Info:

The End

Posted in Black History, People, West Oakland

Delilah Beasley

Delilah Beasley – undated

Delilah Beasley was a columnist for the Oakland Tribune and was the first African American woman to be published regularly in a major U.S. newspaper. 

She is most known for her book “The Negro Trail-Blazers of California,” published in 1919 and reprinted in 1968. 

Early Life

Delilah Leontium Beasley was born Cincinnati, Ohio, just after the Civil War on September 9, 1871 (some report 1867) to Daniel Beasley, an engineer, and Margaret Harris.

Beasley began her newspaper career in 1887, writing for the black newspaper, the Cleveland Gazette on church and social activities.

After her parents’ death, she went to Chicago and took a position to learn massage: she desired to become a nurse, which she became a few years later.

She traveled to California to nurse a former patient and stayed.

After moving to Oakland in 1910 at the age of 39, she wrote for the Oakland Sunshine and the Western Outlook.

In 1910 3,055 African Americans were living in Oakland.

Trail-Blazers

To help her race; to open doors into the arts and sciences for the negro boys and girls, has been the impelling force for Delilah Beasley”

Los Angeles Times Jul 13, 1919

Oakland Tribune April 16, 1915

Beasley spent the first nine years in Oakland researching Black Americans’ history in the west at the University of California at Berkeley. She also would give presentations at local churches.

An early cover of the book

In 1919 she self-published a book called The Negro Trail Blazers of California. The book chronicled African American “firsts” and notable achievements in early California. The book includes diaries, biographical sketches, poetry, photographs, old papers, conversations with old pioneers, and a comprehensive history of early legislation and court cases.

California Eagle Dec 7, 1918
California Eagle March 15, 1919

Activities Among Negroes

Her book paved the way for Beasley to become the first African American women in California to write regularly for a major metropolitan newspaper. She worked for the Oakland Tribune from 1923 to 1934 and wrote a weekly column entitled “Activities Among Negroes.”  The column carried civic and religious news of the black community

Civic Organizations

Beasley was determined to advance the rights of African Americans and women; she joined many civic clubs. These included the NAACP, the Alameda County League of Women Voters, the National Association of Colored Women, the Oakland Council of Church Women, and the Linden Center Young Women’s Christian Association.

She was an honorary member of the League of Nations Association of Northern California.

Oakland Tribune March 3, 1928

Delilah died at the age of 62 on August 18, 1934.  Beasley is buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

Oakland Tribune Aug 19, 1934

She live for many years at 705- 34th Street.

Exterior of Delilah Beasley’s house, 705 34th Oakland, CaliforniaAfrican American Museum & Library at Oakland 

More Info:

The End

Posted in East Oakland, Transportation

The Bancroft Parkway

This is one of those posts where I had no writing intention, let alone knowing it existed. Two examples are my most popular post, “The Forgotten Tunnel” or “The Backyard Fence War” I stumbled across articles on both while researching another post. Sometimes they pan out, and I find lots of exciting things to share. I wasn’t so lucky with this post, and it ended up being kind of a dud. I thought I would share it anyway

Groundbreaking

A groundbreaking celebration was held in November of 1956 for the new Bancroft Avenue Parkway, and construction began soon after.

Oakland Tribune November 25, 1956

Bancroft Avenue was to become a major thoroughfare linking San Leandro and Oakland, relieving the traffic on MacArthur, Foothill, and East 14th (now International)

Oakland Mayor Clifford E. Rishell and Alameda County Supervisor were at the controls of an enormous earthmover, lifting the first load of earth.   

Construction for the Bancroft Avenue Parkway near 98th Avenue in the city’s Elmhurst district. DATE: 1956 Photographic print Albert “Kayo” Harris & Associates, photographers. the Oakland Public Library, Oakland History Room.

They symbolized the joint city-county participation.

Oakland Tribune November 25, 1956

The project’s estimated cost was $4,000,000 and was financed jointly from Oakland and Alameda County allocations of state gas tax funds.

Needed Relief

California Highways and Public Works Oakland Progress Page 37 – March- April 1958 

The need for this arterial was foreseen as early as 1927 when the major street plan of the City was formulated. Uncontrolled subdivision in East Oakland in the early history of the city had left a large area with no provision for the important east-west movement

California Highways and Public Works Oakland Progress Page 37 – March- April 1958 

The parkway was to provide the much needed relief of Foothill Boulevard, MacArthur Boulevard and East 14th Street (now international), as well as a direct connection to an existing major city street, Bancroft Avenue in San Leandro.

Studies for this thoroughfare were commenced in 1941 and protection of the right-of-way started.

The Bancroft Parkway

The parkway was to extend from the San Leandro city limits to East 14th Street(now International) and 46th Avenue.

“The project will convert Bancroft from a rundown noncontinuous street and railroad right-of-way to a major intercity thoroughfare and railroad parkway.”

California Highways and Public Works Oakland Progress Page 37 – March- April 1958 
Corner of Bancroft and 96th Avenues in the Elmhurst district of Oakland, California. 1965 Photographer unidentified. Oakland Public Library, Oakland History Room.

The Design

The parkway had a two-lane section on each side with room for parking. In the center divider was the Southern Pacific railroad spur line to the Chevrolet Assembly Plant.  It was concealed with trees and shrubbery.

California Highways and Public Works Oakland Progress Page 37 – March- April 1958 

The Units 

  • The first unit was 1.17 miles and was from the San Leandro border to 90th avenue.
  • The second unit was between 90th to 79th Avenues. – June 1957
  • The third unit was 79th Avenue to Havenscourt Blvd – Spring 1958

Total Length: 4.25 miles

Oakland Tribune June 14, 1957
Oakland Tribune Aug 26, 1961

Removal of Buildings

The City of Oakland acquired property along the route.

  • The east side of Church Street and 68th Avenue.
  • Between 90th Avenue and Parker Street.
  • The western side of Church Street and 73rd Avenue
  • The south side of Bancroft Avenue east of 74th Avenue.
  • The north side of Bancroft Avenue between 96th and 98th Avenues.

The following is a list of structures that were removed for the extension of the Bancroft Parkway.

Oakland Tribune

A miscellaneous collection of buildings along Bancroft Avenue between 73rd Avenue and Havenscourt Blvd. were offered for sale by the City of Oakland.  

Oakland Tribune Apr 16, 1958

The assortment included duplexes, a store, several homes, and garages. They had to be moved or demolished. The minimum bid was $2,850 for the entire group.

Oakland Tribune 1961

The Final Destinatination

Oakland tribune March 27, 1951

Today Bancroft Avenue is down to one lane in each direction with bike lanes.

More:

The End

Posted in Homes, Model/Display Homes, Oakland Tracts, Uncategorized

High Street Park Homes

In early 1926 J.B. Peepin announced that his company would be building approximately thirty-one in the High Street Park Tract on Culver Street.  Prices averaged $5950 for five rooms, with a down payment of only 10% and 1% of the balance.

Oakland Tribune Nov 14, 1926

Peepin was already well known in Oakland and San Leandro as a builder of Bungalows. 

Living rooms have studio ceilings, and the newest wall treatments. Hooded fireplaces, in latest designs. Each house has a breakfast room, with a hand decorated breakfast set, included in the purchased price.”

Oakland Tribune July 26, 1926

Charming hand stenciled kitchens, with linoleums, and every built-in convenience including kitchen cabinets and refrigerators.”

Oakland Tribune July 26, 1926
Oakland Tribune Aug 22, 1926

Gardens are laid out to suit each home, with lawns, shrubs, patio entrances and fish ponds.”

Oakland Tribune July 26, 1926

Casa Linda

  • 4100 Culver Street
  • Built 1926
  • Price $5950-$6200

Casa Linda opened on July 18, 1926. The home was entirely furnished by Montgomery Wards & Company.

Oakland Tribune 1926

The Home Beautiful”

Oakland Tribune July 18, 1926

Casa Linda, as the name implies is an unusually beautiful Spanish home, and embodies in its design and ornamentation new and pleasing innovations by our architectural service.   Oakland Tribune July 18, 1926

Orange was the kitchen tile color, the hand-decorated furniture, and wall-paper in the breakfast room. Spanish galleons are the motif of parchment shades.

Oakland Tribune July 18, 1926

 The exterior of “Casa Linda” was enhanced by the patio entrance with stepping stones and a fish pond.

Casa Palomar or Palomares

  • 4150 Culver Street
  • Built 1926
  • Price $5950-$6200

Opened in September of 1926 and was furnished by Montgomery Wards and Company.

Oakland Tribune Sept 19, 1926
Oakland Tribune Oct 17, 1926
4150 Culver Street – Google maps

Casa Novia

  • 4157 Culver Street
  • Built 1926
  • Price $5950-$6200

Casa Novia opened to the public on December 5, 1926 it was furnished by Lachman Brothers of San Francisco.

Display Home Is Especially Designed for Newly-Weds, Builder Says”

Oakland Tribune Dec 5, 1926
Oakland Tribune Dec 5, 1926

An arched doorway opens into the front hall affording a glimpse of a large living room with arched windows. The dining room and breakfast room are separated by columns and the kitchen is decorated with orange tiles.

Sold in 2020

In August of 2020 “Casa Novia” was put on the market for $789,000 and sold for $820,000 in October of 2020.

Culver House

  • 4132 Culver Street
  • Built 1927
  • Price $6250

The furnished home went on display on April 24, 1927.  

Oakland Tribune May 1, 1927

Large rooms, with plenty of sunshine make this home appeal to the housewife.”

Oakland Tribune Apr 24, 1927
Oakland Tribune April 1927

Sold in 2020

The was listed for $889,000 in November of 2020 and sold for $955,000 in December.

Villa Romancia

  • 4145 Culver Street
  • Built 1927
  • Price $6775

Villa Romancia opened to the public in January of 1927.

Oakland Tribune 16, 1927

“Castles in Sunny Spain”

ROMANCE! MYSTERY! That is what you think of when you see Villa Romanica.”

Oakland Tribune Feb 13, 1927
Oakland Tribune 1927

Open House 2021

In January of 1921 Villa Romancia is for sale. The listed price is $699,000. An open house was held on January 3, 2021.

Culver Street Homes

Oakland Tribune Aug 21, 1927

List of Model Homes:

  • 4100 Culver Street – Casa Linda
  • 4132 Culver Street – Culver House
  • 4145 Culver Street – Villa Romancia
  • 4150 Culver Street – Casa Palomar
  • 4157 Culver Street – Casa Novia

More Info:

  • 4157 Culver Street – website
  • The Bungalow Book By J.B. Peppin – flickr

The End