Posted in Architecture, Oakland Tracts

Cameron Built

Beautiful Homes in Oakland’s Warm Belt

Fifty “Cameron Built”  Modern Spanish Home in the Fruitvale  District. True Spanish Type Stucco. Priced at $5500 to $65.00. Built to CAMERON standards. (whatever that means). Each home contains five rooms and breakfast room, hardwood floors throughout, tile bath, tile sink , Hoyt water heater, fireplace for coal, wood or gas, latest style electric fixtures, base plugs in every room. Russwin solid brass hardware with glass knobs. All of large lots with fences, garage and cement walks.

The tract was designed by W. A. Doctor and built by H.C. Cameron with furnishings provided by Lachman Brothers.  Chas. A Neal was the exclusive agent for “Cameron Built Homes” on Maple and School Streets. The tract office was located at Pleitner and School streets

The 1st unit started in 1923 on Maple and School Streets.

The 2nd unit was started in 1925 at Texas and Pleitner Streets. 

Oakland Tribune Nov 25, 1923

The first ten homes were completed and ready in November 1923. 

By October 1924 twenty-two homes were complete

Oakland Tribune Nov 16, 1924
Oakland Tribune Nov 24, 1924
The corner of Texas Street and Curran Ave – Google Maps
Oakland Tribune Nov 24, 1924
3039 Texas Street – Present Day Google Maps
Present Day Maple Street
Posted in Architecture, Model/Display Homes

26 Ascot Court – Piedmont Pines

Model Home Opens –

26 Ascot Court is on a quiet cul-de-sac in Piedmont Pines and it opened for inspection in October 1935.

Oakland Tribune – Oct 07 1934
See here
in 2019 from Realtor.Com

The French regency designed home was a joint effort of Frederick L. Confer and his father F.W. Confer.

The house was built on slopping lot  among the pine trees with a picturesque view of the bay and the Golden Gate . The lot is just under 1/2 acre in size.

The home was sold before it was completed. The buyer was R.F.D. Le Mon of New York, who was planning on making Oakland his home.

R.F.D Le Mon was the developer of the Le Mon Park section of Piedmont Pines.

Mitchell & Austin were the realtors in charge of the property.

Featured in Architectural Magazine

October 1936

The house featured in an article called ” Homes – They Are Building Them Now” in the October 1936 edition of The Architect and the Engineer.

Architect and Engineer October 1936
Architect and Engineer October 1936
Architect and Engineer October 1936
Architect and Engineer October 1936
Architect and Engineer October 1936 –

Frederick L. Confer has designed many homes in the Oakland. Including the Style House which was discussed in a previous post.

In 1937 he designed another home for R.F.D. Le Mon at 14 Cornwall Court .

Putting down roots in Montclair

In 1944 Admiral Thomas Sprague and his family moved into 26 Ascot Court . But his life in the Navy took off and the traveled around the world. In 1951 Sprague retired from the Navy and they settled in after only living in the for 2 weeks in the 8 years they owned it.

The Sprague Family lived there until about 1963 after Mrs. Sprague passed away.

A Montclair Treasure – March 2019

In March of 2019 the house was put on the market for $ 1,249, 000 and it sold for April of 2019 for $1,300,000.

From Realtor.com
Realtor.Com
Realtor.Com

Links:

The End

Posted in Early Montclair, Home Building, Montclair Tracts

How to Build a Log Cabin

Oakland Tribune April 1922

In 1922 few people outside the hikers of the Contra Costa Hills Club, knew much about Pinehaven and its beautiful canyon. Pinehaven has all the characteristics of the most picturesque parts of Marin County. Roads have now been opened up. The property was originally laid out to be known as Upper Piedmont, but the owners changed the plans and decided to put it on the market for those who want summer home cabins close to downtown and transportation.

Pinehaven is located in Montclair

Oakland Tribune Feb 1922
Oakland Tribune April 1922

Lawrence Block of the Villa Site Sales Company was in changed with the sale of the property and Block said:

Pinehaven is a summer home colony with its pretty cottages and cabin homes nestling in the side-hills, overlooking canyons and with in twenty minutes from City Hall. You awaken in the morning to the song of the birds refreshed and full of vigor and imagine you have traveled a hundred miles to the wilds of some distant state.

Oakland Tribune April 1922

This was Villa Site Sales Company first big sale and they were offering it at mortgage prices. The sale price was as low as $175.00. More than 50 cabins and cottages were being planned.

Oakland Tribune April 1922 – Road Work in Pinehaven

Lots of building going on…

Oakland Tribune May 1922

Simple Plans for a Log Cabin –

Oakland Tribune May 1922
Oakland Tribune May 1922

Building Bungalows in Foothill Canyons

Oakland Tribune Jun 1922

Pinehaven Is Building Up

Oakland Tribune June 1922

Pitch Your Teepee or build an log cabin in the woods of Pinehaven.

Oakland Tribune May 1922
Oakland Tribune July 1922
Oakland Tribune 1922
Oakland Tribune Sep 1922
Oakland Tribune Sep 1922
Oakland Tribune May 1922

The End

Posted in Architecture, Montclair Tracts

Drake Drive – Montclair Highlands

In 1937 Frederick L. Confer designed a “modernistic’ (now art deco) home for Mr and Mrs George H. Everest and their two daughters. The Everest family had been living at 1760 Mountain Blvd prior to moving into their new Montclair Highlands home at 1831 Drake Drive.

The home was developed by Emge and Stockman and was built by James H. Anderson who has worked with the architect before.

Oakland Tribune Oct 11, 1936
Oakland Tribune Mar 1937
Oakland Tribune Mar 1937 – 1831 Drake Drive

The house has four bedrooms upstairs with two bath rooms. The lower floor has one bedroom with bathroom and a private entrance.

The view at sunset

Behold the amazing views from all upstairs bedrooms, dining room, living room and patio. The large corner lot also a large yard

The house is completed in June 1937

Oakland Tribune June 1937

The House has been on the market many times since 1937.

Oakland Tribune 1946
Oakland Tribune – 1949

1955 – it listed for $24,500

Oakland Tribune 1955

In 1969 it listed for $46,500

Oakland Tribune 1969

In March of 2019 it is listed for sale at $1,695,000.

More on 1831 Drake Drive

The End

Posted in Architecture, Model/Display Homes, Montclair Tracts

Style House – Piedmont Pines

Oakland_Tribune_Sun__May_26__1935_

Oakland_Tribune_Sun__May_19__1935_Screen Shot 2019-03-28 at 8.29.14 PM

The Tribune Jackson Style House – 5739 Chelton Drive

The “Style House” opened to the public in April of 1935. Over 1500 visitors passed through the home that first weekend.

The home was designed by local architect Frederick L. Confer with James H. Anderson and the builder was James Armstrong.

The agents for the house were Mitchell & Austin with Harry Stockman the agent in charge.

The house was completely furnished by the Jackson Furniture Company.

Oakland Tribune April 1935
Oakland Tribune April 07, 1935

The View then and Now

Oakland Tribune March 1935
From Google Maps

Award Winning

The house is a modified Regency type design. It won an award for the distinguished “house of seven rooms or less” in the fourth Biennial Exhibition of American Architects. The house has also been called Monterey Style. Color is used abundantly in the house, the exterior is painted whited with mustard color shutters.

Oakland Tribune May 1935

Unique Home and Cozy Interior

The living room with vaulted ceiling has French doors to the delightful front patio as well as the rear deck with SF and Bay views.

The floor plan has a full bath and generous bedroom on the main level with French doors to the patio. There are two more large rooms up, one with a deck for enjoying the views! The lower features a bedroom which would be ideal for a family/rumpus room, half bath, a generous laundry/craft room with work station and storage area. Two car garage.

Oakland Tribune May 1935

On opening day a local Ford Dealer had a brand new Ford V8 parked outside the house.

Oakland Mar 31, 1935
Oakland Mar 31, 1935

Style house in 2018 – Realtor.com

Oakland Tribune 1944
Oakland Tribune 1955
Oakland Tribune 1969

More on the Style House –

The End

Posted in Architecture, History, Oakland

Oakland…The White City

This is not about race. It about when Oakland city planners decided to market Oakland as “The White City”.  As a suggestion to future designers and builders.  It was not intended to be used in public, just circulated among builders and planners of the city.   I get the thinking behind the slogan and can almost picture Oakland with the sun shining on the buildings.  The was not the first time the slogan of a White City was used.  The Great White City

This was in 1914.


‘White City, Oakland Plan

Years ago in about 1914, a noted architect(of the time) while looking back at Oakland from a ferryboat “he spoke of it as “The White City”.   What he saw was the new shiny white buildings of Oakland, turn golden in the sunlight.   Oakland on a  “sunny day, the blue sky, and white buildings, turned golden in the sun, remind one of the mystical cities of Maxfield Parish”  Oakland Tribune Oct 1916

Oakland_Tribune_Sun__Oct_29__1916_
The origin of  Oakland… The White City – Oakland Tribune October 28, 1916

Style as Artistic Feature

In 1914 a plan to further the beautification of Oakland and designed to make Oakland more striking from the bay.   Members of the Oakland Commercial Club,  A.S. Lavenson, vice-president of the club, and city planning enthusiast and H. A. Lafler of the same organization. Oakland Commercial Club, Oakland, 1913;

Their idea was to suggest that builders in the future especially in the taller buildings use white material.   Oakland, as a “white city” situated before the hills in an elevated position could be remarkable sight.  A great mass of white buildings, with tall spires or tower, like many of that time “give semblance of, will it is declared, Oakland truly wonderful”  Oakland Tribune Sept 1914.

Already the from the bay the new City hall City Hall, the new federal building, and the Central Bank building Central Bank Building and other tall buildings in white, present a remarkable site all standing out from brown hills and their surroundings “like great monuments to progress”  Oakland Tribune Sept 1914

Oakland_Tribune_Sun__Sep_13__1914_ (2)
Oakland Tribune  Sept 1914

Uniform Skyline and White Buildings