Posted in Black History, Buildings, East Oakland, Laurel, Schools, Then and Now, West Oakland

Then & Now – Oakland School Part 16

In this series of posts, I hope to show Then and Now images Oakland Schools.  Along with a bit of history of each school, I highlight. Some of the photos are in the form of drawings or postcards, or from the pages of history books.

Note: Piecing together the history of some of the older schools is sometimes tricky. I do this all from home and online — a work in progress for some.  I have been updating my posts with new information or corrections.

Let me know of any mistakes or additions.

King Estates Junior High School

In 1956 the city of Oakland and the Board of Education (OUSD) agreed to purchase a 46-acre tract on Mountain Blvd. near the Oak Knoll for future development as a combined school and recreation area.

Central National Savings Bank Map 1923

They purchased the land from the heirs of Arthur Dale King a Hillsborough millionaire, who died in 1952.

Under the agreement, 19 acres of the total 46 were for the two new schools.

In June of 1958, the Board of Education approved the plans for the new King Junior High School on Fontaine Street.

Groundbreaking Oakland Tribune Feb 1959

The estimated cost of the school was $1,638,445. The school was designed by the firm of Confer and Wills.

Oakland Tribune Jun 1958
 

Oakland Tribune Jun 1958
  • Twenty-six classrooms
  • Gymnasium
  • Library
  • Multipurpose room
  • Administrative Offices
  • 800 Students

In October of 1960, the board ok’d the name “King Junior High” for the new school in King Estates.

 

Oakland Tribune Sept 06, 1960

School Shooting

 

Oakland Tribune March 18, 19

Oakland Tribune March 1973

In March of 1973, 15-year-old Leonard Key watched his mother die by a sniper’s bullet outside the school gym. Leonard’s mother, Mrs. Kay Key, and two sisters had just seen him play in an all-star basketball game.

Police arrested two 15-year-old boys who confessed to firing random shots onto the campus with a sawed-off shotgun and a .22-caliber pistol.

King Junior High Today

 

Google Maps
 

Google Maps
 

OUSD Photo
 

Google Maps
 

OUSD Photo

In 2005 two small highs schools opened at the campus; they are the Youth Empowerment School and East Oakland Community High School.

Now Rudsdale Continuation School and Sojourner Truth School are there.

More Info:

Ralph J. Bunche Elementary

No early pictures of Bunche Elementary

 

Oakland Tribune

Named in Honor of

The school named for Ralph Johnson Bunche (1903-1971). He taught Political Science at Howard University and was the first African American to get a Ph.D. in political science from an American university. He worked with helped Martin Luther King Jr. He was the first African American to be honored with the Nobel Peace Prize. He helped form the United Nations and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President John F. Kennedy.

Bunche Visits the School

In 1966 Ralph Bunche paid a visit to the school that bears his name.

“I have been waiting to come and see you since the school was established. I’ll try not to do anything that would anything that will embarrass you.”

Ralph K. Bunche 1966

Ralph K. Bunche 1966

Ralph K. Bunche 1966

He spoke to the 450 students in the play yard of the school. He then spent about an hour shaking hands with all the children and signing autographs.

After the event, some of the children said:

“He’s real nice, I liked the way he talked,” said Claudia Mason age 10

“He’s an intelligent man,” “He’s a real fine gentleman “
said Wayne Jackson age 10

Tribute to Bunche

Ralph Bunche Day was held on November 19, 1971. The children of the school paid tribute to the man the school is named after.

Oakland Tribune Dec 11, 1971
 

Oakland Tribune Dec 11, 1971

Ralph Bunche died on December 9, 1971.

As good as anyone”

Shirley Coleman, 5th grader

Shirley Coleman, 5th grader

Shirley Coleman, 5th grader

Bunche School Today

Ralph J. Bunche Continuation School – 9-12

The school is located at 1240 18th Street

 

Ralph J Bunche Today _ OUSD
 

Ralph J Bunche Today _ OUSD
  • Ralph J. Bunche website – OUSD
  • Who is Ralph J. Bunche – OUSD

More Info:

McFeely School

No early pictures of McFeely School

McFeely elementary school opened in Sept pf 1947. The school was located at the corner of Fifth and Peralta Streets.

 

Oakland Tribune 1947
 

Oakland Tribune
 

Oakland Tribune 1949

The school was closed in the early 1960s because it was in the way of the New Post Office in West Oakland

More Info:

Redwood Heights Elementary School

No early photos of Redwood Heights

The school was called the Laurel Annex School and was organized in May of 1935.

The name officially changed to Redwood Heights School in June of 1935.

 

Location of the first School

The first school was located at 4359 Bennett Place.  Avenue Terrace Park is there now.

New School and location

The Oakland Board of Education officially broke ground on the site of the new school at Mountain Blvd and 39th Avenue. The new school was the tenth building as part of the 1948 tax election.

The two-story building had 11 classrooms, a kindergarten, an auditorium, and a library. Donovan and Kerr were the architects.
4401 39th Ave, Oakland, CA 94619

 

Redwood Heights Construction 1959
Oakland History Room Photo

Redwood Heights Today

4401 39th Ave, Oakland, CA 94619

 

Redwood Heights Home – OUSD
 

Redwood Heights Home – OUSD
 

Redwood Heights Home – OUSD
 

Redwood Heights Home – OUSD

Westlake Junior High School

No early photos

The Board of Education approved plans for the new school in February of 1927.

The plans called for a two-story steel and concrete structure at an estimated cost of $260, 000. The “Spanish type” building constructed in the form of an L and had 35 classrooms, a gymnasium, shops, and an auditorium.

 

Oakland Tribune 1928

Westlake Junior High was known as Lakeview Junior High.

Dedication Ceremony

The formal dedication of the school was held on March 14, 1928.

Name Change

Renaming the school became necessary to avoid conflict with Lakeview elementary school.

The students wanted the school named after Col. Charles Lindbergh. The board decided against that. Lakeview Junior High became West Lake Junior High in May of 1929

One hundred sixty-two students graduated from West Lake Junior High on June 06, 1929. “The Biggest Class Ever.”

Oakland Tribune June 1928
 

Oakland, CA December 13, 1953 – Heralds from Westlake Junior High School opens the Christmas Pageant at the Oakland Auditorium. (Russ Reed / Oakland Tribune Photographer) (Photo by MediaNews Group/Oakland Tribune via Getty Images)

Westlake Today

2629 Harrison Street, Oakland, California 94612

  • Westlake Middle School website – OUSD
 

Westlake Today – OUSD
 

Westlake Today – OUSD
 

Westlake Today – OUSD
 

Westlake Today – OUSD

More Info:

The End

Posted in Allendale, Buildings, East Oakland, Laurel, Schools, Then and Now

Then & Now – Oakland Schools Part 8

 In this series of posts, I hope to show Then and Now images Oakland Schools.  Along with a bit of history of each school, I highlight. Some of the photos are in the form of drawings or postcards, or from the pages of history books. 

Note: Piecing together the history of some of the older schools is sometimes tricky. I do this all at home and online — a work in progress for some. I have been updating my posts when I find something new. Let me know of any mistakes or additions.

Fruit vale Public School” Fruitvale No. 1

The Fruit vale (as it was sometimes spelled) School district was formed in 1889 to build a new schoolhouse.

Fruit Vale Public School
Fruitvale School, the early 1880s situated on ‘the field
Standing in front of the school are the female teachers and the children 
OMCA Collection

San Francisco Examiner Jun 04, 1989
Oakland Tribune Jan 07, 1889
Oakland Tribune July 26, 1889

From what I can tell is the school was in the same general location of where Fruitvale Elementary school is today, at the corner of Boston Street and School Street.

New Life as Church

In 1896 after the Fruitvale No. 1 was built, the old school was moved and remodeled for use as a church. It was re-dedicated as the Higgins Methodist Episcopal Church in Mar of 1896.

SF Call Mar 09, 1896

SF Examiner Mar 1896

Fruitvale No. 1 – Fruitvale School Elementary

SF Call – Aug 27, 1895

In 1894 the  Fruitvale School district, the trustees were forced to meet the demand and take steps to build a larger school. The new school replaced the old Fruitvale School building from the 1880s.

The present quarters a ramshackle shanty, will be moved and a new building will be erected in its place.

SF Examiner Mar 29, 1895

SF Examiner Mar 29, 1895

The pastures of the Empire Dairy surrounded the school from 1880-1901

Oakland Tribune 1970

Back in 1885, the site at Boston and School Streets overlooked the city of Oakland and the Bay of San Francisco.

Fruitvale School circa 1901

The style of the new building was the Italian Renaissance. The architects were Cunningham Bros. of Oakland.

The plans called for a $13,000 2-story building with a concrete basement. Each floor was to have four large classrooms and lunchrooms for the teachers. The principal’s office was on the first floor, and space was reserved for a library. In the basement, there were separate playrooms for the boys and girls, janitor rooms, and a heating apparatus.

In 1913 Fruitvale School No. 1 was changed to just Fruitvale School.

New School Built

Oakland Tribune Nov 1949

The new Fruitvale School was dedicated on December 1, 1950. The new school has 14 classrooms, a library, a cafeteria, a kindergarten, and an auditorium. The school was designed by Ponsford and Price Architects and cost $497,700. The school has room for 569 students.

The dedication was attended by William Taylor, a long-time resident of the Fruitvale District, he was a student at the “old Fruitvale School “in the 1880s. Oakland Tribune June 1962

  • Fruitvale School website – OUSD

More on Fruitvale Elementary

Fruitvale School No. 2 Hawthorne School

Oakland Tribune July 1903

In 1905 an addition to the school added 9 more rooms.

In 1913 Fruitvale School No. 2 name was changed to Hawthorne School. The school was on Fruitvale at East 17th (Tallant Street)

In 1923 a concrete culvert was built, and Sausal Creek was filled in.

School Destroyed by Fire in 1923

New School Built

The district purchased the property fronting on East 17th Street, adjoining the playground. The new school was built away from the noise and traffic of Fruitvale Ave.

Oakland Tribune Sept 1924

In September of 1924, they laid the cornerstone of the new school building. The school was designed by John J Donovan.

The new school is located at 28th Avenue at East 17th Street across the street from where the old Fruitvale School No 2 was located. The old school building was destroyed by fire the year before.

Oakland Tribune Sept 1924

The following items were put into the sealed cornerstone:

  • Minutes of Board of Education May 1924
  • Minutes of Board of Education June 1924
  • Outline of the school plans
  • Program from Cornerstone ceremony
  • History of the PTA
  • Names of all the pupils enrolled
  • Group photos of all the classes.
  • School Directory

The new school opened in January of 1925.

Oakland Tribune Jan 1925

The school is located at 1700 28th Ave, Oakland, CA 94601

Hawthorne Now

Today Hawthorne is the home of the Achieve Academy.

Achieve Academy (TK-5) serves students in the Fruitvale neighborhood and is one of the highest performing elementary campuses in Oakland.

Google Maps –

Google Maps –

Google Map – today

Fruitvale No. 3 – Allendale School

Fruitvale School No. 3 was built in the Allendale neighborhood in 1904.

Before 1904 children living along High Street had to make the long walk to Fruitvale School No. 1 on School Street in Boston. Allendale was chosen because of its central location to the children from Laurel Grove District (Laurel District) to High Street and down to Foothill Blvd, then known as Old County Road.

The 1904 school building cost $107,437 to build. The first years’ enrollment was 809. A four-room addition in 1910 and another four-rooms costing $49,458 were added in 1928.

Oakland Tribune July 1910

Miss Alice V. Baxley was the first principal of Allendale School from 1904-1913.

Fruitvale No 3 –
Renamed Allendale 1913

In 1913 Fruitvale No. 5 was renamed Allendale School.

Oakland Tribune Mar 19113

Oakland Tribune Mar 1914

Dangerous and a Hazard –

The school was deemed unsafe and closed in 1953. At the time, it was one of the oldest school buildings, there were 2 others from the pre-1906 era still standing. The old school building withstood the 1906 earthquake.

San Francisco Examiner Dec 1953
SF Examiner Dec 20, 1953

17 portables were placed on the site to house the students until the fall of 1959.

Oakland Tribune 1957

The day of reckoning has come for the old Allendale School building which has been razed”

Oakland Tribune Jul 14, 1957

Oakland Tribune Jul 14, 1957

Oakland Tribune 1957

Oakland Tribune 1957

New School Built –

Plans for a new school were drawn up by architects George E. Ellinger and Roland Gibbs to cost $363,250.

Oakland Tribune June 18, 1958

Bids for a new school with 13 classrooms, library, multipurpose room, one kindergarten, and administration offices opened in 1958.

The school was completed in the fall of 1959.

Moving Day June 1959

Oakland Tribune Nov 8, 1959

Allendale Today

  • Allendale School Website – OUSD

Fruitvale – Allendale Junior High

A new Fruitvale School to be built in the Rhoda Tract at Hopkins Blvd ( MacArthur Blvd). The school to cost $100,000.”

Oakland Tribune 1909

Oakland Tribune 1909

The new school was called the Allendale – Fruitvale Junior High and was constructed at the Hopkins (MacArthur Blvd) and Coolidge Avenue.

Oakland Tribune 1928
Oakland Tribune Nov 09, 1928

The name of the Allendale – Fruitvale Junior High was changed to Bret Harte Junior High at a school board meeting in 1929; the other name under consideration was Dimond Junior High.

The school was named after  Bret Harte, who was an American author and poet and best known for his somewhat romanticized accounts of pioneer life in California. He lived in Oakland from about 1854 to 1857 at the home of his stepfather, Colonel Andrew F. Williams, who was later Oakland’s fourth mayor.

The school was the last to the new school to be built out of the 1924 Bond issue. It was constructed at the cost of $120,000.

The building contained 22 classrooms and had 699 pupils enrolled on opening day in 1930. The school took graduates from Fruitvale, Allendale, Sequoia, and Laurel Schools.

The school opened in 1930.

The school’s auditorium gymnasium building was constructed in 1950.

In 1957 the school district opened bids for a new building at Bret Harte.

The new building was built on the campus in 1959, another major expansion took place in 1979.

The 1930 time capsule in a copper box found during the 1979 construction was never opened and was since lost.

The school is located at 3700 Coolidge Avenue Oakland, CA 94602

Bret Harte Middle SchoolToday

Google Maps
  • Bret Harte Middle School – website

More on the Fruitvale District Schools

The End

Posted in Buildings, East Oakland, Laurel, Schools, Then and Now, West Oakland

Then & Now – Oakland Schools Part 1 – A

My 100th post!

This is the first in a series of posts on Oakland Schools.

I hope to show Then and Now images of most of the schools, along with a bit of history of each school I show. Some of the photos are in the form of drawings, postcards, or from the pages in history books.

Note: Piecing together the history of some of the older schools is sometimes tricky. I do this all at home and online — a work in progress for some. I have been updating my posts when I find something new. Let me know of any mistakes or additions

Updated Dec 28, 2019

Castlemont High School

Castlemont High School is in Oakland, California, United States, formerly known as East Oakland High School. The Castlemont name was selected by a vote of the students. Castlemont High School was founded in 1929 in a medieval-style building. The school is located at 8601 MacArthur Boulevard.

 Castlemont High was designed by Chester Miller and Carl Warneke, Oakland architects. Oakland Local WIki – Castlemont High.

Pouring the Foundation
Castlemont Under Construction
CAstlemont Under Construction
Castlemont Under Construction

On August 12th, 1929, East Oakland High School opened at the cost of $670,000. Still, the name was short-lived, by a vote of the students and faculty in 1930 the name Castlemont was officially brought to prominence before being nationally designated the most beautiful school structure in the country.

Castlemont Entrance – Reflecting Pond
Castlemont Shops

The buildings’ main entrance accessed from Foothill Blvd down six steps to the reflection pool then ascends six steps to the extended terrace and the four entry solid redwood doors.  The full length of Castlemonts grounds adjacent to Foothill having been magnificently landscaped.

Castlemont High circa 1929

Castlemont High circa the 1930s

The building was replaced in 1961 as the old one was not earthquake safe.

Castlemont is demolished
Castlemont is gone.

Castlemont Today

Castlemont Today
OUSD Today

Castlemont High Today

For eight years, from 2004 to 2012, the large school housed three separate smaller schools called the Castlemont Community of Small Schools. The smaller schools were known by the names:

  1. Castlemont Leadership Preparatory High (10-12)
  2. Castlemont Business and Information Technology School (10-12) (CBITIS)
  3. East Oakland School of the Arts (10-12)

Dewey School

Dewey School was established as an elementary school at 38th avenue and East 12th Street in 1899. It was a part of the Fruitvale School District.

It was named after Admiral George Dewey, who was a hero in the Spanish-American War that was being fought at that time.

Oakland Tribune April 28, 1899

In 1964 Dewey became the first continuation high school in Oakland. Below is how Dewey looked in 1964. In 1913 an addition was added to the original school, and it was still in use in 1964.

Oakland Tribune June 12, 1964

Dewey is now located at 1111 2nd Ave, Oakland, CA, 94606

Dewey Today

Franklin School

Oakland Tribune March 1928

The Brooklyn School was a two-story building built in 1863-64 at the cost of $5,000.

Oakland Evening Tribune Jan 20, 1887

Brooklyn was annexed into Oakland in 1872. After the annexation, the nine-year-old school was renamed Franklin Grammar and Primary School.

Dec 30, 1874

An addition to the school was added in 1879 at the cost of $3,217.

Oakland Tribune Dec 30, 1902

On December 02, 1902, the school was destroyed by fire.

Oakland Tribune 1904
Oakland Tribune April 18, 1906

When the SF earthquake of 1906 struck, the new school building was almost complete. The brick and steelwork were done, and the building was ready for the roof. When the school was finally done, the total cost was $204,343,45.

Screen Shot 2020-01-28 at 12.41.39 AM

 

Franklin Grammar School – Cheney Photo Advertising Circa 1912

Franklin School

In 1923 an oblong-shaped assembly hall was built at the rear of the school on 10th Ave and E16th. The cost $40,000.

Oakland Tribune 1926

In 1943 the schools’ address was 1530 Ninth Avenue.

In 1953, the 1906 brick building was declared unsafe. In 1955, it was demolished to make way for a new building. The new school was a principal part of the Clinton Park Urban Renewal Project. The school opened in Sept 1956 and was dedicated in Jan of 1957. The new school cost $467,000.

In 1956 a man while remodeling his store found an old report card from 1875.

Oakland Tribune Dec 20, 1956Oakland_Tribune_Sun__Mar_27__1960_ (1)Oakland Tribune Mar 27, 1960

 

Franklin Elementary – today

More Info:

The school is located at 915 Foothill Blvd

Fremont High School

The John. C. Fremont High School was the successor of Fruitvale High School and was organized in 1905 by Frank Stuart Rosseter.

Oakland Tribune 1910

John C Fremont High School

Cheney Photo Advertising Company circa 1910

The old building was destroyed in an arson fire on the night of January 1, 1930.

Oakland Tribune Jan 2, 1930
Oakland Tribune Jan 3m 1930

New School

Oakland Tribune Jul 29, 1931
Oakland Tribune Jan 10,1932

The school reopened on April 19, 1932. It was constructed with the assistance of the federal Public Works Administration (P.W.A.) funds.

Fremont Today

Fremont School Today –

More Info:

Frick Junior High

Frick was built on the Boulevard between Baker and Bay View (now Foothill and 62nd). The school takes its name from W.P. Frick, who donated the lot the school is to be built on. It was then part of the Lockwood District. The school was dedicated on March 17, 1909.

W.P Frick School

circa 1913 Photographer: Cheney Photo Advertising Company

The first school was kindergarten through the seventh grade. The building had 8 rooms. With the rapid growth of the area around Frick School, it was decided to make Frick school a junior high in 1923.

New School

Oakland Tribune May 30, 1926

In 1927 a new school was built on adjoining land and was called Frick Jr. High School. The style of the new building Spanish and Moorish architecture.

Oakland Tribune Jun 05, 1927

Another New School

In 1953 it was determined that the 1927 building was an earthquake risk. In 1957 the was broken for a new school fronting Brann Street. The old building was razed during the summer of 1960. The present school has been in use since 1960-61.

Frick Middle School Today

Frick School today – Google Maps

It is now called Frick Impact Academy

More Info:

Hamilton Junior High School

Alexander Hamilton Junior High was built in 1922. The school is located at 2101 35th Avenue.

Athletic Festival at Hamilton Junior High

It was named after Calvin Simmons sometime in the early to mid-1980s. The school was renamed United for Success Academy in 2006.

The school today. Google Maps

More Info:

Horace Mann Grammar School

Horace Mann was built in about 1910-1912. The school is located at 5222 Ygnacio Avenue. It was known as Melrose Heights School first.

Horace Mann Grammar School
Ygnacio and Vicksburg Avenue

Cheney Photo Advertising Company circa 1912

Groundbreaking for the new Horace Mann school after it was determined to be not earthquake safe was in 1959. The new school was formally dedicated in 1961.

Oakland Tribune May 11, 1959

Horace Mann today – Google Maps

More Info:

Sequoia Elementary School

Sequoia Elementary School is located on Lincoln Avenue at Scenic Avenue. It was built in 1910. Ida M. Hammond was the first principal. The building below is facing Scenic Avenue. The address of the school is 3730 Lincoln Avenue.

Original Sequoia School
Lincoln Avenue and Scenic Street

Cheney Photo Advertising Company circa 1910

In 1926 a new school building was built adjoining the original. The new building will have 13 to 14 rooms and an auditorium. It will face Lincoln Avenue, as seen below.

The original building is razed to make room for a new $235,880 addition. The addition added seven classrooms and a cafeteria.

Oakland Tribune Nov 28, 1958

Sequoia School today. Google maps

More Info:

Please see Part 1 B for University High School

The End

Posted in Dimond District, Laurel, Oakland Tracts

Hopkins Town – in the Dimond District

In Hopkinstown every lot is practically level, all lots are big and deep with sewer, water, gas and electricity in front of every lot.

Oakland Tribune Aug 15, 1922

Oakland Tribune Aug 15, 1922

Hopkins Town was a small subdivision in the Dimond District.

HopkinsTown was located at Hopkins St (now MacArthur Blvd) Georgia, Maple, and Peralta Ave (now Coolidge) and Carmel and Morgan Streets.

California Subdivision Company handled the sales. It opened in September 1922.

Was the Josiah Rose Farm

Hopkinstown was once the farm of Josiah Rose, who settled there in 1864. When Rose lived on his farm, the Antonia Mario Peralta was his neighbor.

Rose Farm 1877 Map

From the 1894 Directory
Oakland Tribune Dec 13, 1884

In 1922 Rose’s daughter Mary Mulrooney (Mulroony) and her son James still lived on a small piece of the farm on Peralta Street (now Coolidge). I found that in 1933 Mary lived at 2844 Georgia Street, which is part of a small commercial area that Loard’s Ice Cream is today. Mary died in 1933.

From 1933 Directory

2844 Georgia St – Google Maps

Hopkinstown Like City Within a City ;In Oakland

Oakland Tribune

Oakland Tribune

Oakland Tribune Aug 14, 1922

Get a Home — Your Own Buy — Build –Live In Hopkinstown All for $49 First Payment

Oakland Tribune Aug 17, 1922

The fastest growing “small home” community in the state.

Oakland Tribune 1922

Oakland Tribune 1922

Every lot is a GOOD lot, and NO HILLSIDES!

“HopkinsTown” Is the Latest

Oakland Tribune Aug 20, 1922
His home was on Georgia Street

NO MISTAKE! FREE Home Plans

Oakland Tribune Sept 1922

Oakland Tribune Sept 07, 1922

Oakland Tribune Sep 07, 1922

From Bare Ground to Housekeeping in Two Days

Oakland Tribune Sept 14, 1922

Church for Hopkinstown

Oakland Tribune Sept 14, 1922

Oakland Tribune Oct 1922

I didn’t find many homes that were built in Hopkins Town, at least they weren’t advertised. This is the area I live in now. I drove around the area, trying to locate some of the homes. I did notice small homes on deep lots.

In the late 1950s, the unsold Hopkins Town lots were being rezoned for duplexes or apartment buildings. The large lots zoned for single-family homes has long caused the planning department problems.

Oakland Tribune 1959

Today I noticed on Morgan Street there is lots of building going on. They are converting a few of the Hopkins Town Tract “lots’ into duplexes or triplexes.

The End