Posted in Homes, Montclair, People

On Moraga Avenue

An Enterprising Family and Their New Home in the Montclair District.Oakland Tribune

Mr. and Mrs. John W Martinsen’s like many others in the area took on the task of building their own home.

Mrs. Martinsen would serve a hot lunch for them from a cabin they had built in the back of the lot.

The home is located on the corner of Moraga Avenue and Estates Drive.

1923
1930
From the 1943 Directory

They lived there until sometime in the mid-1940s.

 

She dresses in a regulation feminine hiking costume, and is able and effective assistant to her husband.

Oakland Tribune

Photos

Intersection with Estates Drive c 1950
Public Works Photo,
Oakland Cultural Heritage Survey, Oakland City Planning Department
intersection with Estates Drive, this east image from 1951
Public Works Photo,
Oakland Cultural Heritage Survey, Oakland City Planning Department
From Google Maps

Location

The Martinsen Home – Google Maps
  • 5901 Moraga Avenue at the corner of Estates Drive
  • John W. Martinsen – builder and owner
  • $10,000
  • 1922

More…

Oakland Tribune Nov 03, 1930

The End

Posted in Dimond District, Laurel, Oakland Tracts

Hopkins Town – in the Dimond District

In Hopkinstown every lot is practically level, all lots are big and deep with sewer, water, gas and electricity in front of every lot.

Oakland Tribune Aug 15, 1922

Oakland Tribune Aug 15, 1922

Hopkins Town was a small subdivision in the Dimond District.

HopkinsTown was located at Hopkins St (now MacArthur Blvd) Georgia, Maple, and Peralta Ave (now Coolidge) and Carmel and Morgan Streets.

California Subdivision Company handled the sales. It opened in September 1922.

Was the Josiah Rose Farm

Hopkinstown was once the farm of Josiah Rose, who settled there in 1864. When Rose lived on his farm, the Antonia Mario Peralta was his neighbor.

Rose Farm 1877 Map

From the 1894 Directory
Oakland Tribune Dec 13, 1884

In 1922 Rose’s daughter Mary Mulrooney (Mulroony) and her son James still lived on a small piece of the farm on Peralta Street (now Coolidge). I found that in 1933 Mary lived at 2844 Georgia Street, which is part of a small commercial area that Loard’s Ice Cream is today. Mary died in 1933.

From 1933 Directory

2844 Georgia St – Google Maps

Hopkinstown Like City Within a City ;In Oakland

Oakland Tribune

Oakland Tribune

Oakland Tribune Aug 14, 1922

Get a Home — Your Own Buy — Build –Live In Hopkinstown All for $49 First Payment

Oakland Tribune Aug 17, 1922

The fastest growing “small home” community in the state.

Oakland Tribune 1922

Oakland Tribune 1922

Every lot is a GOOD lot, and NO HILLSIDES!

“HopkinsTown” Is the Latest

Oakland Tribune Aug 20, 1922
His home was on Georgia Street

NO MISTAKE! FREE Home Plans

Oakland Tribune Sept 1922

Oakland Tribune Sept 07, 1922

Oakland Tribune Sep 07, 1922

From Bare Ground to Housekeeping in Two Days

Oakland Tribune Sept 14, 1922

Church for Hopkinstown

Oakland Tribune Sept 14, 1922

Oakland Tribune Oct 1922

I didn’t find many homes that were built in Hopkins Town, at least they weren’t advertised. This is the area I live in now. I drove around the area, trying to locate some of the homes. I did notice small homes on deep lots.

In the late 1950s, the unsold Hopkins Town lots were being rezoned for duplexes or apartment buildings. The large lots zoned for single-family homes has long caused the planning department problems.

Oakland Tribune 1959

Today I noticed on Morgan Street there is lots of building going on. They are converting a few of the Hopkins Town Tract “lots’ into duplexes or triplexes.

The End

Posted in History, Homes, Oakland

The Boyd Log Cabin

This log cabin located across the street from the entrance to Joaquin Miller Park at 3551 Joaquin Miller Road. It was built in 1922 by Thomas”Hal” Boyd.

3543 Joaquin Miller Road
3551 Joaquin Miller Road – Back of the cabin
3551 Joaquin Miller Road – Google maps

High above the city on Joaquin Miller Road, he designed and built a log cabin. He used timber that had been cleared close by.

Hal Boyd loved the outdoors so much, so he learned to paint so he could express his love. The log cabin was his studio, where he painted. In 1926 he had an exhibit of his artwork.

During the day, he was employed by the city as a forest ranger to watch over Sequoia Park (now Joaquin Miller Park).

When his parents Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Parker Boyd, lost their home in the Berkeley fire of 1923, he added on to his cabin, giving them a place to live. – Oakland Tribune Jan 06, 1926

Oakland Tribune Jan 06, 1926
For rent Oakland Tribune Jul 23, 1924
Oakland Tribune – 1927
Review from his Berkeley Exhibit

He worked as a special promotion and production manager for the Woodminster Summer Concert Series during the 1945 season.

Oakland Tribune Jan 12, 1945
Oakland Tribune Aug 08, 1950

I found this article from 1955. It says the cabin was destroyed in a fire. I don’t know if this true or case of the wrong address. 3543 Joaquin Miller Road is the house next door. The cabin is still there.

San Francisco Examiner April 17, 1955

Sometime in the 1950s, he moved to Carmel, CA – He lived there until he passed away in August of 1990.

  • In 2014 the cabin sold as a “fixer-upper” for $260,000. REDFIN.Com
  • Ask Art – Thomas Hal Boyd – Biography
  • An Architectural Guidebook to San Francisco and the Bay Area – page 277
Posted in Early Montclair, Homes, Montclair Tracts

How to Build a Log Cabin

Oakland Tribune April 1922

In 1922 few people outside the hikers of the Contra Costa Hills Club knew much about Pinehaven and its beautiful canyon. Pinehaven has all the characteristics of the most picturesque parts of Marin County. Roads have now been opened up. The property was initially laid out to be known as Upper Piedmont, but the owners changed the plans and decided to put it on the market for those who want summer home cabins close to downtown and transportation.

Pinehaven is located in Montclair.

Oakland Tribune Feb 1922
Oakland Tribune April 1922

Lawrence Block of the Villa Site Sales Company was in changed with the sale of the property and Block said:

Pinehaven is a summer home colony with its pretty cottages and cabin homes nestling in the side-hills, overlooking canyons and within twenty minutes from City Hall. You awaken in the morning to the song of the birds refreshed and full of vigor and imagine you have traveled a hundred miles to the wilds of some distant state.

Oakland Tribune April 1922

This was Villa Site Sales Company’s first big sale, and they were offering it at mortgage prices. The sale price was as low as $175.00. More than 50 cabins and cottages were being planned.

Oakland Tribune April 1922 – Road Work in Pinehaven

Lots of building going on…

Oakland Tribune May 1922

Simple Plans for a Log Cabin –

Oakland Tribune May 1922
Oakland Tribune May 1922

Building Bungalows in Foothill Canyons

Oakland Tribune Jun 1922

Pinehaven Is Building Up

Oakland Tribune June 1922

Pitch Your Teepee or build a log cabin in the woods of Pinehaven.

Oakland Tribune May 1922
Oakland Tribune July 1922
Oakland Tribune 1922
Oakland Tribune Sep 1922
Oakland Tribune Sep 1922
Oakland Tribune May 1922

The End

 

Posted in Early Montclair, History, Transportation

The First Bus Lines in Oakland

New Service to Montclair
From Ac Transit Time Sept 1961

In May of 1921, The Key System began to operate a motorcoach service. The first line opened up on May 16, 1921, to Mills College and a week later on May 21, service to Montclair began.

The Realty Syndicate purchased and paid the bills for the motor coaches, to provide transportation for potential customers to Montclair. The coaches were painted to match the streetcars.

There is a little dispute as to which line was first, the Montclair, or the Mills College lines. My feeling is a tie – they both started in May 1921.

The first tract office was a tent, and later it was a small building.  The tract office was then moved the triangle piece of land at Mountain Blvd, Antioch St, and Antioch Ct.  The building later became the offices of Winder Gahan, real estate agents in dealing with Montclair.  The original site as seen in the photo was located on the opposite side of Moraga Rd (at LaSalle) which is now in the middle of the Warren Freeway (Hwy 13).

Oakland_Tribune_Sun__Feb_25__1940_ (1)
Offices of Winder Gahan at Antioch St and Antioch Ct. circa 1942

 The Schedule

During the commuting hours, 6am-9am and 5 to 7pm every 20 minutes. During the remainder of the day, a 40-minute service. The fare was 6¢ with transfer privileges to streetcars.  In 1924 they offered service to run until midnight.  Before this, bus transportation had been confined to the out-of-town service along the highway.

New Terminal – October 1928

In 1928 a new $18,000 Terminal was built in Montclair.  It was located at the corner of Mountain Blvd and La Salle, a short walk to the Sacramento Northern station.  The Spanish Style building was designed by local architect  Hamilton Murdock and was the first building structure in Montclair.  An Architectural Guide – Pg. 276 

The building is still standing and is located at  6206 La Salle Ave.

A Reunion

In September of 1961, a forty-year-old photo led a reunion between to former drivers who pioneered local motorcoach service in the East Bay.

J.L. “Marty” Martin started working in May 1921, and C.E. Pehrson began in September of that same year.  They met in Montclair at the approximate site of the first terminal and discuss new verses or coaches and how much things had changed.

AC Tansit newsletter
Sept 1961 – Reunion – Please see link ( 2) below to read the online version of this

Various from the Oakland Tribune

References
  1. Historical Photo of Early Bus Found  Transit Times April 1975
  2. Reunion of early drivers  Transit Times September 1961
  3. More on A.C. Transit – Transit Times September 1963

The End