Posted in Black History, People

Lydia Flood Jackson (1862-1963)

When Lydia Flood Jackson died at the age of 101 in 1963, she was the oldest native of Oakland.

1963

She was the daughter of a freed slave, the first Negro to attend an integrated Oakland public school in 1872, and went on to become a leader of the women’s suffrage movement in 1918.

Oakland Tribune Jul 10, 1963

Lydia was born on June 9, 1862, at her family home in Brooklyn Township, now a part of Oakland.

She died on July 8, 1963. Services were held at the First A.M.E. Church in Oakland, California, formerly known as the Shiloh African Methodist Episcopal Church, which her parents helped found in 1858.

Funeral Program – Flood Family Papers

Negro Trail Blazers

Her father was Isaac Flood, and her mother was Elizabeth Thorn (Thorne) Scott Flood.  They were among the outstanding Negro pioneers of California, according to the historical publication “Negro Trail Blazers of California.”

Her father was born a slave in South Carolina and was freed in 1838, he traveled to California during the Gold Rush, settling in Oakland.

In 1854 her mother founded California’s first Negro School in Sacramento and was the first teacher.  She also founded a private school for minority groups in Alameda County in 1858, when Indians, Negroes, and Chinese were not allowed in White public schools. The school was at their home at 1335 East 15th Street in Oakland.

Elizabeth Thorn Flood – African American Library

The Flood’s had son George who is believed to be the first African American child born in Alameda County. Elizabeth and Isaac Flood were not only one of the earliest African American families in the Oakland area, but they were also one of the most prominent and progressive.

 Education

In 1871 her father, a leader of the Colored Convention, successfully fought to have Negro children admitted to public schools.

The Oakland School Board passed the following resolution:

Oakland Tribune July 1963

In 1872 his daughter Lydia became the first student to attend the Swett School (later the Old Bella Vista School). Then she attended night school at Oakland High and later married John William Jackson in 1889.

Activist and Clubwoman

Lydia Flood Jackson – Flood Family Papers

Jackson was a member of the Native Daughter’s Club and the Fannie Jackson Coppin Club for forty-two years. Jackson was also a leader in the California Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs. While a member of the Federation, she on them to demand women’s suffrage. While addressing the organization’s 1918 state convention, she told her audience.

Today we are standing on the threshold of a great era looking into futurity to the mid-day sun of Democracy”

Lydia Flood Jackson 1918

Lydia Flood Jackson 1918

Entrepreneur and Inventor

She founded Flood Toilet Creams, a successful West Coast cosmetic business which manufactured toiletries, creams, and perfumes. (I wish I could find more information on this)

Carolyn Carrington pins corsage onto Lydia Flood Jackson as they stand before the altar of church Circa 1960s
Oakland Tribune June 1962

Lydia Flood Jackson was honored on her 100th birthday by the City of Oakland as their “oldest living native and daughter of the first Negro school teacher in California.”

Oakland Tribune June 1962

Lydia Flood Jackson lived at 2319 Myrtle later in life.

More Info:

The End

Posted in History, People, Streets

George L. Lynde – Lynde Street

In 1990 my Ex-husband and I bought a home on Lynde Street in the Fruitvale District. I immediately wanted to know why it named Lynde Street? Who was Lynde?

Lynde Street was declared a public road in 1886.

Oakland Tribune Dec 06, 1886

Geo L. Lynde owned the land in 1878

Map of Oakland and vicinity map number nine.
Published by Thompson & West, Oakland, Cala., 1878

Rumsey Collection
Location of George L. Lynde’s land in 1878

George L. Lynde was born in about 1838 in the state of Vermont. I don’t know when he bought the property. He lived in the area in 1866. In 1877 he lived on Fruitvale Ave near 27th Street, which is close to Lynde Street. He lived on 10th Street in 1880. He was a teacher and the superintendent of the Industrial School. He owned Tin Shop (plumbing, hardware, and gas fixtures), Lynde & Howard, on East 12th, possibly with a partner. The shop suffered a significant fire in 1878. He was a Trustee for the Fruit Vale Water Company. Member of the Brooklyn Good Templars. He was married at least twice, maybe three times, and had around four children. He spent the last part of life in San Francisco. George Lynde died in 1915.

California Voters Registration 1866
1870 Federal Census for the Brooklyn Township in Oakland
1880 Federal Census for District No 12 in Oakland

His young son was accidentally shot by a playmate while they were playing “robbers” out by the barn. Not sure if the name of his son is correct.

Stockton Daily Evening Herald Jun 30, 1870
Oakland Tribune Sep 12, 1879
Oakland Tribune Mar 4, 1880

Articles of Incorporation – Fruit Vale Water Company

San Francisco Examiner Sep 03, 1868
Oakland Tribune Aug 27, 1875

Owned a Tin Shop

Oakland City Directory 1871
1876 Oakland Directory
1877 Oakland City Directory
Oakland Tribune Aug 1874
Oakland Tribune May 24, 1878

Member of the Brooklyn Good Templars

San Francisco Examiner Nov 09,1874

Misc Articles

Oakland Tribune Mar 17, 1877

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